OrbiterWiki:Random tutorial

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Random tutorials displayed on the Main Page are selected from the following list. Every tutorial in the list has an equal chance of appearing on the Main Page. Feel free to add more - just edit this list!

Note that you must be a registered user to edit this list.

List

These are all the articles which have a precis and can appear on the Main Page. The articles are listed alphabetically.

FreeCompilerSetupThumb.png

Free Compiler Setup. Many Orbiter add-ons come with source code which can be compiled using the free Visual Studio. However, there are a few things that need to be done to make Orbiter projects compile in it. This tutorial goes through the steps necessary to configure Visual Studio for use with Orbiter. (More...)


GPIS_1_1.png

Go Play In Space, Chapter 1. Go Play In Space is the classic introduction to Orbiter for new orbinauts and those looking to expand their horizons. Chapter 1 will help you get up and running with a basic setup. (More...)


Shuttle Entry 3.jpg

Intuitive Atmospheric Reentry. It is a common complaint on the Orbiter message boards that the aerodynamics on the Space Shuttle model are screwed up. This is usually reported after a person deorbits the vehicle, puts it in the right angle of attack... and then bounces off the atmosphere several times and overshoots the Cape. I know, I've done it myself. Here's how to enter the correct way. (More...)


MoonThumbTransparent.png

LEO-lunar transfer tutorial. "... Congratulations, you're on your way to the Moon. So, a couple of days later... You've arrived! The Moon is getting pretty big in the viewscreen. Really big. Too big in fact. Oh dear, we're about to impact the lunar surface at some 17,000 miles per hour. Now what?" (More...)


Transfer orbit example

In spaceflight, rendezvous refers to the event in which two spacecraft meet. This can occur in space or on the surface of a celestial body.

A rendezvous usually takes place in orbit, e.g. when spacecrafts are travelling to a space station. If two spacecraft are close enough to each other (< 300m) and travel in similar orbits they are said to rendezvous. In such a situation, both spacecraft can stay close to the space station with minimal corrections. (More...)


Example

Below is an example of a random article generated by the list:


Shuttle Entry 3.jpg

Intuitive Atmospheric Reentry. It is a common complaint on the Orbiter message boards that the aerodynamics on the Space Shuttle model are screwed up. This is usually reported after a person deorbits the vehicle, puts it in the right angle of attack... and then bounces off the atmosphere several times and overshoots the Cape. I know, I've done it myself. Here's how to enter the correct way. (More...)